Talk the Talk – Know the Mortgage Lingo at Closing

What the heck are they talking about?

Many borrowers go through the closing process in a haze, nodding, smiling, and signing through a bunch of noise that sounds like Greek.

Even though you may have put your trust in your real estate and mortgage team, it helps to understand some of the terminology so that you can pay attention to specific details that may impact the decisions you need to make.

Common Closing Terms / Processes:

1. Docs Sent

Buyers sit on pins and needles through the approval process, waiting to find out if they meet the lender’s qualification requirements (which include items such as total expense to income, maximum loan amounts, loan-to-value ratios, credit, etc).

The term “docs sent” generally means you made it!! The lender’s closing department has sent the approved loan paperwork to the closing agent, which is usually an attorney or title company.

Keep in mind that there may be some prior to funding conditions the underwriter will need to verify before the deal can be considered fully approved.

2. Docs Signed –

Just what it implies.  All documentation is signed, including the paperwork between the borrower and the lender which details the terms of the loan, and the contracts between the seller and buyer of the property.

This usually occurs at closing in the presence of the closing agent, bank representative, buyer and seller.

3. Funded –

Show me some money!

The actual funds are transferred from the lender to the closing agent, along with all applicable disclosures.

For a home purchase, if the closing occurs in the morning, the funds are generally sent the same day. If the closing occurs in the afternoon, the funds are usually transferred the next day.

The timing is different for refinancing transactions due to the right of rescission. This is the right (given automatically by law to the borrower) to back out of the transaction within three days of signing the loan documents. As a result, funds are not transferred until after the rescission period in a refinancing transaction, and are generally received on the fourth day after the paperwork is signed.

(Note – Saturdays are counted in the three day period, while Sundays are not). The right of rescission only applies to a property the borrower will live in, not investment properties.

4. Recorded –

Let’s make it official. The recording of the deed transfers title (legal ownership) of the property to the buyer. The title company or the attorney records the transaction in the county register where the property is located, usually immediately after closing.

…..

There you have it – an official translation of closing lingo.

As with any other important financial transaction, there are many steps, some of which are dictated by law, which must be followed.

_________________________________

Related Articles – Closing Process / Costs

March 28, 2010 by · Leave a Comment

Related Posts

About Lester

In 1973, I graduated high school and started college. In 1977, I met and married my wife Deborah of 40 years, put on a suit and tie, and went to work for Prudential Insurance Company. In 1979, my wife was offered a great job as an advertising executive for a San Jose television station, so we moved from the Monterey Bay area to San Jose, CA. I needed a new job in San Jose and I didn’t really want to start from scratch with a new insurance office. While going to college, I had managed a Travelodge, and it was that management experience that landed my new job and started my career in real estate as a property manager. In 1980, I completed my first certification course with the National Apartment Management Accreditation Board (NAA), and in 1983, I earned my Certified Apartment Manager (CAM) designation which I keep current today. In 1984, my daughter Pearl was born, and in 1987, my son Max was born. When I was managing rental properties, many of my tenants wanted to become homeowners, so in 1988, I got my real estate sales license with the California Department of Real Estate to help them with that goal. As a new Realtor, I found that obtaining financing is the first and most important step to shopping for a home, so in 1989, I completed my first of many programs in real estate finance and loan officer training. In 2000, I stopped doing property management and real estate sales altogether, to concentrate on mortgage loan origination exclusively with Coast Capital Mortgage. In 2004, I moved from Coast Capital Mortgage to join First Priority Financial. In 2014, First Priority Financial changed its business model from mortgage brokerage and banking to just mortgage banking. To better serve my clients and stay a competitive mortgage broker, I joined C2 Financial Corporation. How many people can truly say that they love the company that they work for? I can! ◾C2 Financial Corporation is a mortgage brokerage and a banker. ◾They are A rated and accredited by the Better Business Bureau. ◾Members of National Association of Mortgage Brokers ◾FHA and VA approved. ◾Managed by principals with over 62 years experience in the mortgage industry. ◾Partners with the largest banks in the U.S. ◾One of Scotsman’s Guide Top Mortgage Originators of 2012 and 2013. I’m a lucky guy that loves my job and the people that I work with. Every day borrowers entrust me with one of the most important financial decisions of their life and I don’t take that responsibility lightly. I do what is best for my clients and know that by doing so I’m not only doing what is morally and ethically right, this belief system will result in my borrowers referring me additional clients, which is the best long-term business model. So far so good!

Leave a Comment