Calculating The Net Benefit Of A Refinance Transaction

Calculating the net benefit of refinancing can be a challenging task if you do not understand what to calculate. We are going to focus on the net benefits of refinancing from the standpoint of lowering your interest rate.

Although there are several reasons to refinance, lowering your mortgage rate to save on interest payments over the term of the loan is the most popular.

Calculating the actual savings can be a tricky chore unless you know the difference between cash flow savings and interest savings. If your refinance objective is to only save on the interest by lowering your rate, then the interest savings should be done with the calculations below.

Calculating Interest Savings:

(Loan Amount x Interest Rate) / Months in year = Interest paid per month

($200,000 x 6% or .06) / 12 = $1,000.00

*Remember to do the calculation in the parentheses first*

We now know that you are paying $1,000.00 per month in interest. You should take the new interest rate you are getting with your refinance and calculate what your new interest payment will be.

($200,000 x 5% or .05) / 12 = $833.34

Now we need to find out the difference between the two interest rates.

Current Interest Payment – Proposed Interest Payment = Interest Savings

$1,000.00 – $833.34 = $166.66

Now you have figured out that by dropping your interest rate 1% on $200,000 you will be saving $166.66 per month or about $2,000 per year.

Awesome!

Anyone would want to save $2,000 per year, where do I sign… right? Not so fast, you’ll want to calculate the break-even point to find out how you will benefit after your closing costs.

Net Benefit Formula (Break-Even):

(Closing Costs – Escrows) / Interest Savings = Month of Break-Even

($6,000 – $1,000) / $166.66 = 30 Months

In other words, it will take 30 months for you to recoup the cost of your refinance. If you plan to keep your mortgage for at least 30 months then you might want to consider this deal.

Okay, now we can calculate your net benefit for refinancing with one more calculation.

(Monthly Savings * Months you plan to keep mortgage) – (Closing Costs –Escrows) = Net Savings

($166.66 * 120 months) – ($6,000 – $1,000) = $14,999.20

If you kept the mortgage for 120 months (10 years) you would save $15,000.

Okay, now you can find out where to sign.

Calculating the net benefits of a refinance is crucial in determining if it is strategic for you to refinance. Keep in mind that each mortgage is slightly different and you may need to adjust calculations accordingly.

……

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q:  I heard that I should only refinance if I drop 1% on my mortgage is that true?

Some people say ½% , 1% to never. Every mortgage is different.

For Example: A no cost loan can have a 1 month break-even point with only a .25% drop in interest rate. Now that you know how to calculate your net benefit, you are able to figure out what may be best for your situation.

Q:  Why can’t I just compare my current payment to the proposed payment and figure out my net benefit?

You could just compare just the two payments if you wanted to find out your cash flow savings, but the current and proposed loans may have two different amortizations.

Let’s assume you currently have a 15 year mortgage and you’re comparing it to a 30 year mortgage. If both loans have the same interest rate and loan amount but the amortization is different, your interest savings per month would be $0. However, you are going to show a cash flow savings with the 30 year mortgage because of the longer amortization.

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Related Article – Refinance Process:

March 28, 2010 by · Leave a Comment

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About Lester

In 1973, I graduated high school and started college. In 1977, I met and married my wife Deborah of 40 years, put on a suit and tie, and went to work for Prudential Insurance Company. In 1979, my wife was offered a great job as an advertising executive for a San Jose television station, so we moved from the Monterey Bay area to San Jose, CA. I needed a new job in San Jose and I didn’t really want to start from scratch with a new insurance office. While going to college, I had managed a Travelodge, and it was that management experience that landed my new job and started my career in real estate as a property manager. In 1980, I completed my first certification course with the National Apartment Management Accreditation Board (NAA), and in 1983, I earned my Certified Apartment Manager (CAM) designation which I keep current today. In 1984, my daughter Pearl was born, and in 1987, my son Max was born. When I was managing rental properties, many of my tenants wanted to become homeowners, so in 1988, I got my real estate sales license with the California Department of Real Estate to help them with that goal. As a new Realtor, I found that obtaining financing is the first and most important step to shopping for a home, so in 1989, I completed my first of many programs in real estate finance and loan officer training. In 2000, I stopped doing property management and real estate sales altogether, to concentrate on mortgage loan origination exclusively with Coast Capital Mortgage. In 2004, I moved from Coast Capital Mortgage to join First Priority Financial. In 2014, First Priority Financial changed its business model from mortgage brokerage and banking to just mortgage banking. To better serve my clients and stay a competitive mortgage broker, I joined C2 Financial Corporation. How many people can truly say that they love the company that they work for? I can! ◾C2 Financial Corporation is a mortgage brokerage and a banker. ◾They are A rated and accredited by the Better Business Bureau. ◾Members of National Association of Mortgage Brokers ◾FHA and VA approved. ◾Managed by principals with over 62 years experience in the mortgage industry. ◾Partners with the largest banks in the U.S. ◾One of Scotsman’s Guide Top Mortgage Originators of 2012 and 2013. I’m a lucky guy that loves my job and the people that I work with. Every day borrowers entrust me with one of the most important financial decisions of their life and I don’t take that responsibility lightly. I do what is best for my clients and know that by doing so I’m not only doing what is morally and ethically right, this belief system will result in my borrowers referring me additional clients, which is the best long-term business model. So far so good!

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